Workshops for Service Management 2016 announced!

Service Management 2016 has announced workshops for 2016!

This year, a range of half-day and full-day workshops are on offer to supplement your Conference experience.

The workshops will take place in Brisbane on Tuesday 16 August 2016 – so you can dive in and get a head start on ways to Shake I.T. Up before the Conference kicks off on Wednesday 17 – Thursday 18 August.

Get practical career advice, develop your leadership skills, improve relationship building, ensure smooth delivery from project intention to outcome, discover new methods or rediscover new approaches to familiar topics, including Service Integration and Management (SIAM), Agile, Lean, DevOps, and the Operational Readiness Review (ORR)!

Workshops include:

  • Agile, Lean IT and DevOps – a survival guide for the mid-career professional with Charles Betz
  • Extreme Leadership Workshop: taking the radical leap with Em Campbell Pretty
  • Behave Yourself: Building IT Relationships with Simone Jo Moore and Mark Smalley
  • SIAM: revolution or evolution? with Simon Dorst and Michelle Major-Goldsmith
  • Leading an invisible IT team with Korrine Jones
  • “Are you being served?” An Operational Readiness Review
  • From BID strategy to Operational delivery – where does it all go wrong? with Lana Yakimoff

Register for workshops and the Service Management Conference with the Earlybird rate before 27 June 2016.

And remember, you can still submit to be a speaker this year!

By |2016-04-29T16:26:22+10:00April 29th, 2016|Service Management 2016, Workshop|

Delivering the Message – Things to Consider When Announcing an Organisational Change

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We are delighted to welcome Service Management 2016 invited speaker Karen Ferris as this week’s guest blogger. Karen was awarded the inaugural Service Management Champion accolade by the IT Service Management Forum (itSMF) Australia in 2007 and awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award for her contribution to the ITSM industry in 2014.

Every ITSM improvement initiative is an organisational change. Whether it affects one person or a hundred people, it is an organisational change that requires people to change the way in which they do things. It could be a change in process, technology, roles or responsibilities.

Whatever the nature of the organisational change may be, there are important things to consider when announcing and communicating it.

Honesty

Firstly – be honest. Employees need to know the whole story – warts and all. Too often the CxO and senior managers are concerned that staff will be upset by the forthcoming change and therefore avoid telling the whole truth. If it is perceived that employees are going to be upset by the change announcement, the chances are they certainly will be when the change comes about.

So, it is important to tell them about the change as soon as possible so that they have time to prepare – and you have time to prepare them.

Don’t underestimate the time it will take to identify where the resistance to change may come from, put in place a plan to overcome it, execute the plan, continually assess its effectiveness and make changes as required.

Therefore the sooner you understand the reaction of employees to the change, the sooner you can respond accordingly.

You will only know the ‘real’ response if you are open and honest and provide employees with the whole picture.

Managers need to put themselves in the firing line – be prepared to answer the hard questions and to be transparent.

Transparency and consistency will be key if you want to stop the rumour mill. If employees feel that they are only being told half a story they will make the other half up themselves, making your job even harder.

You don’t want to have to spend the majority of your time trying to dispel rumours that only came about because you did not communicate openly.

Everyone Needs to Be on the Same Page

It is imperative that time is taken to prepare the message and to make sure that everyone who is required to deliver the message is able to tell the same story. Everyone needs to be on the same page. Inconsistency will fuel a fire that is waiting to happen.

Time needs to be taken to prepare the executive, managers, and sponsors who will be required to deliver the message. They need to understand the reason for the change and be champions of the change.

They may need coaching and mentoring to (a) help them overcome any resistance to the change they may have and (b) equip them with the skills and capability to deliver the message effectively.

All communication channels need to carry the same story – where are we going? – why are we doing this? – how does this align with our organisational strategy? – when are we doing it? – how are we doing it? – and most importantly – what’s in it for me (WIIFM)?

Test It

It is a good idea to test the message with a sample group of the target audience to determine if the message is clear, concise and complete. Things you may assume obvious may not be so to all employees so you need to remove the assumptions.

The sample group should help identify the questions that employees will be asking. What you assume people need to know may not be the case.

I remember working in an organisation, some years ago, that was undertaking a relocation of a department to another part of the city. Management assumed that staff wanted to know about recompense for additional travel, whether there would be parking available, how accessible the new location was by public transport etc.

But this wasn’t what was causing concern. It turned out that the biggest question staff wanted to know was whether the kitchen would be equipped with a microwave oven! This was because another department, relocated earlier, had not initially been provisioned with a microwave oven which they had previously had access to.

Don’t assume employees won’t sweat the small stuff. They will! Your sample group can help identify what this may be.

Check It

Throughout the period of communications you need to be checking its effectiveness. You need to regularly check understanding of the message. Don’t assume that because no-one has asked a question that the message has been understood. Silence does not mean that all is good!

There are various ways to check the effectiveness of the communications and it will be the change agent’s job to determine which are the most appropriate for the organisation.

Employees can be surveyed to determine if they understand the change.

At a recent client engagement I created and distributed the communications regarding a forthcoming change. Customers using a particular application were required to change the way in which they submitted service and support requests. The customers were distributed across the country so I followed up the communication by randomly picking names from the email distribution list and telephoning them to determine if they had read the communications and whether they had any concerns, questions etc.

This helped me understand whether the communications were having the desired result and to make any changes as required.

Other methods to determine communication effectiveness include focus groups, observation, monitoring collaboration channels, monitoring traffic on web pages where information about the change resides, monitoring feedback channels etc. It is more likely that if you are not getting feedback or questions, the change has not been understood or is being resisted.

Organisation change management models such as ADKAR can be used to determine if communications are having the desired results during organisational change. ADKAR can tell you whether employees are Aware of the need to change; have a Desire to participate and support; have Knowledge of the change and what it looks like; feel they have the Ability to implement the change on a day-to-day basis; and have the Reinforcement to keep the change in place.

ADKAR is used for much more than just checking communication effectiveness so is an ideal tool to have in your organisational change management toolbox.

Answer the Questions

It is important to answer all the questions received from employees. In the client engagement I mentioned earlier, any questions I received about the change were collated and the answers were distributed in future communications. Each communication had a FAQ section. The chances are that if one person asks a question about the change, there are myriad others wondering the same thing but not prepared to ask.

Collect all questions asked and provide a FAQ either in distributed communications, via collaboration tools and/or on the intranet.

Strike a Balance

Communications should be balanced. They need to be frequent enough to help employees with their transition and addressing their concerns and questions but not overly frequent to the point that people stop paying attention.

Also give due consideration to the communications channels. If employees hate SharePoint, don’t use that to deliver your message despite it being the corporate collaboration tool!

Note: I have nothing against SharePoint!

Use a variety of channels but ensure they are ones that employees will access. Just like communication content effectiveness should be checked, so should the effectiveness of the communication channels.

Monitor the number of emails that are opened. Monitor the number of click-throughs to the web site. Monitor the number of downloads regarding the change from the intranet. Monitor the number of impacted employees attending information sessions.

All of these, and more, can help you determine which communication channels are having the greatest impact so you can give them more focus. There may be communication channels that you stop using as they are having the least impact. But you won’t know unless you monitor it. As with anything else, the adage ‘you can’t manage what you don’t measure’ also applies to change communications.

Summary

Your organisational change communications need to be honest and transparent. The message, and the deliverers of the message, need to be carefully prepared. There needs to be one story and only one story.

Test the message and regularly check the effectiveness of the communications. Answer all the questions being asked and make the questions and answers accessible by all impacted employees. Ensure that your communication channels are appropriate for the change in hand and will be accessed by impacted employees.

Finally, be prepared to change course. If it’s not working, stop and make the required adjustments to get back on track.

This blog post was written by guest blogger and Service Management 2016 invited speaker, Karen Ferris. You can register to hear from Karen and a host of other exciting speakers at Service Management 2016.

Do you have a Service Management story to share? There is still time to submit to be a speaker at Service Management 2016. 

 

By |2018-03-19T16:23:21+10:00April 12th, 2016|guest blogger, Leadership, Service Management 2016|

Welcome to Service Management 2016!

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Welcome to the Service Management blog for 2016!

We are delighted to be back and looking forward to celebrating at itSMF’s annual conference on Wednesday 17 – Thursday 18 August 2016. We will also host a pre-Conference Workshop day on Tuesday 16 August, and of course, the highly anticipated Gala Awards Dinner on the evening of 18 August 2016.

This year, the Conference will be held in beautiful Brisbane, and centres around the exciting theme of Shake I.T. Up! Over two dynamic, invigorating days, we will explore ways to ‘shake up’ IT projects and teams. How can we adapt, innovate, or disrupt to ensure greater agility, long-term improvements, and better outcomes for all?

We are now in the final remaining weeks before speaker submissions close. If you would like to share your successes and challenges and connect with an engaged community of your peers, now is the time to submit a speaker proposal

Over the next few months, our Service Management blog will feature exclusive interviews and articles from our speakers and workshop leaders, as well as content that explores ITSM and how we might think about shaking I.T. up!

We look forward to sharing this with you in the lead-up to Service Management 2016.

Best wishes,

Aprill Allen

Conference Director

By |2018-06-30T15:20:27+10:00April 6th, 2016|blog, ITSM, Service Management 2016|

Service Management 2015 was a blast!

The air is still a-buzz with the excitement of the Service Management 2015 Conference held at Sofitel Wentworth Sydney on the 20th-21st of August. It was a most enjoyable couple of days made special by a prolific line up of speakers, a great range of content, networking opportunities galore and some fantastic sponsor exhibitors! It was great to see so many engaged members of the ITSM community out in force and getting the most out of their conference experience.

itsmf group

This year signalled a movement toward connecting delegates to learnings from outside the IT domain and addressing the theme of Building Customer Value. All four keynotes captivated the audience with their varied expertise and insights.

Lead demographer and social commentator Bernard Salt opened the conference with an engaging and humourous exposition of his insights on Tomorrow’s Customer. Nicole Forsgren PHD then brought the conversation back to the tech sphere with her insider’s look on the the world of DevOps.

On the second day delegates enjoyed an energetic presentation from Atlassian’s co-founder and co-CEO Mike Cannon-Brookes on the ever-important topic of Scaling Service. Rounding out the keynote presentations was motivational speaker and bestselling author Dr Jason Fox, who entertained everyone with his fantastic imagery and leadership strategies.

jason fox

The annual itSMF Industry Gala Awards Dinner on the Thursday night was a fabulous mix of great food, hearty chuckles courtesy of the hilarious Jean Kittson and of course the celebration of some outstanding finalists and winners. The festivities kicked on late in to the night with good conversation and better dancing!

gala dinner2

Service Management 2015 would simply not have happened without our brilliant sponsors Alemba, Atlassian, Axios, CA Technologies, Unisys, UXC, Heat Software, Freshservice, Fujitsu, HP, Xtraction Solutions, BMC, ServiceNow, Sintegral, Solisma, and xMatters. Thank you all again for your support!

Special thanks to all the speakers who helped make this conference an inspiring and motivating one, and to the many volunteers who so graciously offered their time and effort into making this an event to remember!

You can relive delegate observations or start new discussions about the conference using the #smconfAU hashtag on twitter.

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That’s all folks and we hope to see you all in 2016!

By |2018-03-19T16:23:21+10:00August 31st, 2015|blog, ITSM, Service Management 2015, wrap up|

Service Management in an as-a-service world – Part 2

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With guest blogger Ian Krieger.

Why business mapping is critical to effective Service Management and how to get started.

In Part 1 we looked at why the cloud can give IT service management team more control – not less. Now let’s look at how to use business mapping to provide control and visability in a world where applications are offered as subscription services, from a multitude of vendors.

Use Business Mapping To Ensure IT Truly Supports the Business

A map looks at the context of complex systems. We’re familiar with technology roadmaps that match short-term and long-term goals with specific technology solutions to help meet those goals, often presented in a diagram. They are designed to help customers (including internal customers) understand the technology, current and future, that is at work in their business. But the technology view is only one part of the puzzle.
In addition to addressing the business’ immediate and projected needs you need to have a larger view of the product/capability that your organisation provides and the market forces that may impact it. The external forces range from market segment growth, competitive situation and your distribution channels through to political, economic and environmental factors – and more. There are also internal forces including the company, customers, suppliers and other constituents. This view is known as a market audit.
A business map takes this to the next level. It starts with identifying the need that the organisation is addressing with its product or service, the evolution of that product/service from an idea through to a marketable product and eventually a commodity.
Business maps arm the technologist, and business professional, with information that can be used to understand the overall business’ direction and what factors influence the various capabilities that underpin the central need of the value chain. This holistic view of the business gives context for recommendations and decisions. Hint: Get it right and there will be less instances of Shadow IT, as you will be able to understand the emerging needs of the business as it relates to its strategy
Here are six questions to help you start the mapping process:
1. Where are we now with the business capabilities, supporting processes and technologies?
2. What is the visibility and value placed on each of these
3. Where do we want or need to go with these? Ultimately the drive is to head toward commodity, however, that isn’t always the right answer as there are sometimes constraints
4. How do we get to where we want or need to be?
5. As the organisation moves from new and novel to commodity, what are your options for sourcing and delivering?
6. How will we know that we are on track?

If you’d like to know more about business mapping read my blog.

Transparency across multiple vendors

IDC predicts more than 65 percent of enterprise IT organisations globally will commit to hybrid cloud technologies before 2016. This hybrid environment encompasses everything from applications, to platforms to business services, providing the services the business needs dynamically.

So once you’ve mapped your organisation and selected your solutions how do you track and manage service delivery across multiple delivery modes and suppliers? How do you let the business know what is available to it? And how do you encourage the innovation through the adoption of new services?

Integrating the disparate IT and business systems and providing a clear view of what services are available to the business based on Persona allows everyone to know what is available. Most importantly this provides a way of tracking and measuring the services, both individually and holistically as they underpin key business capabilities.

As an Enterprise Solution provider we face this problem ourselves in deliver services to both our internal and external clients. To solve this we created VantagePointSM. This is designed to be a multi-sourced business services automation and aggregation platform. It consolidates disparate enterprise systems into a unified, real-time and personalised stream of intelligence, delivered via a dashboard on laptops, tablets and smartphones. This visibility and control that this offers, allows us and our clients to reduce the effort in maintaining and managing services.

So there’s no need to fear the cloud. Recognise it for what it is – a different way of delivering services that can actually give you more control, not less, provided you take the effort to jump into the driver’s seat and use your map.

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Ian Krieger is the Chief Architect for Unisys Asia Pacific & Japan. He has worked in the IT industry for more than 20 years. He has helped organisations throughout the region understand how to best use services and technology to support their business’ goals and strategies. Ian is a technologist who prefers to look at the practical applications of technology as opposed to the “shiny”.

By |2018-03-19T16:23:21+10:00August 6th, 2015|Business mapping, cloud, guest blogger, ITSM, shadowIT, UNISYS|

Service Management in an as-a-service world – Part 1

Ian-krieger

 

 

 

 

 

With guest blogger Ian Krieger

Why moving to the cloud can give you more control, not less.

What are the opportunities and challenges for the IT service management team in a world where more applications are moving into the cloud, offered as subscription services, from a multitude of vendors? Can you keep control and visibility?

Recently I led a discussion at an itSMF Special Interest Group meeting about IT service management in an “as-a-Service” world – a world where the way IT is procured, delivered and consumed has fundamentally changed with the advent of cloud computing. Not that cloud computing is new by any means – particularly in smaller organisations, but it is now becoming more and more prevalent in large enterprises. Or it is expected to be…

While there has been a lot of hype around “the cloud”, what became apparent at the meeting is that most information is targeted at the executives in high level overviews, or at techies in great technical detail.

Meanwhile, the IT service management team has been left in the cold. There is little clear direction on “how to” or “where to start” and too much hype versus fact. Yet it is the service management team who often has the responsibility to “make it happen”.

In our discussion, which included IT service management professionals from government, financial services and IT vendors, the concerns/queries about service management in a cloud environment were startlingly consistent across industry sectors:

  •        What is the best way to monitor and report service delivery?
  •        How have other organisations done it?
  •        What is hybrid cloud and how do you manage it?
  •        How do you manage service integration across multiple vendors?

The Australian Government defines cloud computing as a model for enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction.

Interestingly, the itSMF group viewed cloud as a commercial model for delivering IT, rather than a technology. And the overriding concern is that these services are not in their control.

So how does cloud impact the policies, processes and procedures service management uses to plan, deliver, operate and control IT services offered to end-users?

For me it comes down to recognising that while traditional IT procurement has changed, you can still be in control; defining a clear – but flexible – business map for how the technology, processes and people will support the business; and ensuring transparency across multiple vendors.

New Ways of IT Procurement Don’t Have to Mean You Lose Control

Much of the fear of losing control comes from the feeling that IT departments are relinquishing control to IT third parties because they no longer own the IT and can’t see, touch or grab it. Yet in many ways they have more control than ever as it is easier to increase or decrease capacity quickly in response to changes in your organisation or the market in which it operates. And, if you chose the right vendor, they should provide you with regularly updated innovative solutions and contracted service levels rather than you being locked into a technology that will start to age as soon as you implement it.

Of course it’s not simple matter of moving everything into the cloud. Sometimes legislative requirements will dictate where data can be stored or who has access to it which may force an application to be insourced. Or it may depend on the maturity of an organisation’s approach to IT – an immature organisation may refuse to outsource because it is simply fearful of doing so whereas a mature approach is open to pushing risk outside the organisation.

And not all clouds are the same. A private cloud is used by a single organisation. A community cloud is for the exclusive use of a specific community of consumers with shared concerns (eg security requirements or mission). A public cloud is for open use by the general public. And a hybrid cloud is comprised of multiple distinct cloud infrastructures (private, community or public). Whilst the debate over public vs. private cloud services rages on, in the context of the above and the relative organisational needs and maturity, they all have a place.

This feeling of a loss of control can be exacerbated by departments choosing their own systems, easily bought and delivered over the Internet. However this “shadow IT” should not be feared – instead it should be seen as an indicator that the IT department is not delivering what they need. This is why business mapping is so important.

 

Part 2 of this blog will cover why business mapping is critical to ensuring IT and Service Management truly support the business and how to get started.

_________________________________________________________________________

Ian Krieger is the Chief Architect for Unisys Asia Pacific & Japan. He has worked in the IT industry for more than 20 years. He has helped organisations throughout the region understand how to best use services and technology to support their business’ goals and strategies. Ian is a technologist who prefers to look at the practical applications of technology as opposed to the “shiny”.

By |2018-03-19T16:23:22+10:00July 30th, 2015|blog, cloud, guest blogger, ITSM, Service Management 2015, shadowIT, UNISYS|

4 critical components of successful IT metrics and reporting with Nikki Nguyen

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Let’s do the numbers

In IT, we love to measure and report. We just can’t help ourselves. But in our efforts to track every statistic possible, we often lose focus. So let’s change that. Let’s start asking questions like… Who will use the metrics? Why do we need them? Are we setting the right performance goals to reinforce the goals of our business–or could we even be working against them? Today, we’ll look at four very practical guidelines for measuring and reporting on IT performance, and for setting the right goals from the start.

1: Make sure IT performance goals jibe with your business goals

I recently opened a ticket online with a hardware vendor to ask about repair service. They responded quickly, and answered many (but not all) of my questions. Most concerning, though, was the email that I received a few minutes later: “Your ticket has been successfully resolved.”

Had it? Says who? While I appreciated the fast response, my issue had not, in fact, been resolved. Did someone close a ticket just so they could say it had been closed? The front line support team was clearly being evaluated on time-per-ticket, or percentage of tickets successfully resolved, or both.

Certainly, time-per-ticket and percentage of tickets resolved are legitimate measurements for IT operations. But what about the underlying problem I reported? If you’re not tracking at the incident and problem level (to look for common, overarching problems and a high volume of incidents associated with them), you’re missing an opportunity to help your business solve problems proactively instead of just reacting to them. More importantly, what about customer satisfaction? I didn’t feel my issue had been resolved. Now, I had to open another ticket and waste more of my own time. I grew frustrated. I gave up on the product.

In a haste to meet their operational performance metrics, they lost sight of much more important business goals: make customers happy and encourage referrals and repeat business.

To avoid this trap in your own organization, look for ways to set meaningful goals and measurements that encourage behavior in line with company and organization-wide goals. Incentivizing a low-level support team to close or escalate tickets quickly can actually cost the company more, and HDI even has the math to prove it:

image1

Source: HDI

So encourage your Level 1 support team to spend a bit longer collecting more information before escalating, and give them the training and resources they need to be more effective at resolving tickets, not just triaging them. The savings adds up quickly.

2: Share different metrics with different stakeholders

Have you ever sat through one of those tortuous meetings where one or more managers each deliver ten slides to share their key accomplishments and metrics for the quarter? The reason they are so torturous is simple: the reports lack context, and they aren’t relevant to you. There are two primary reasons you should cater your reports to the individual stakeholder you are sharing them with:

  • To give stakeholders the information they need to do their own jobs better.
  • To keep them from meddling.

The first is pretty obvious. Different stakeholders care about different things: a front-line IT manager cares deeply about technical performance data, while a CTO cares much more about the bigger picture. Avoid distributing generic, tell-all reports to large audiences altogether, and instead, meet with your key stakeholders and agree on the right measurements to help them achieve their goals.

The second is less obvious, but equally important. People love to meddle. We all do. I’ve watched a very senior IT executive review a very low-level list of unresolved IT incidents. He didn’t need that data. In fact, he had directors and managers he completely trusted to achieve the goals he had put in place. Once he had the data in front of him, he couldn’t help but ask questions and get involved. Distraction ensued.

The moral? Don’t include data for data’s sake. Yes, you need to be completely transparent about your performance, what you’re doing well, and how you can improve. But you don’t want to give the entire sink to every person who asks for a drink of water.

3: Use visuals to make reports easier to understand.

Excel spreadsheets full of raw data aren’t very effective as report-outs to your team members, peers, and leadership, because they require the viewer to interpret the data.

Fortunately, adding context to the data isn’t always so hard if you are already using a strong reporting dashboard. You want to provide clean, crisp, and easily understood reports that provide enough context to quickly communicate how you are doing against your goals, your benchmarks, and your history.

image2

For practitioners and front-line managers, consider using daily reports to show the top 10 issue types over the last 24 hours. They’re easy to read and understand, and can help your staff quickly hone in on any emerging categories that may growing in popularity.

image3

Trending reports can be even more helpful, because you can compare your performance over a period of time, and look for any anomalies that might be worth exploring further. If you looked at your time-to-resolution data in a vacuum each month, you would never notice that July and August showed a strong upward climb in the number of issues opened.

What caused that influx of new issues? Was a new software revision released? Did you ship a new product? Why were nearly a third of July’s issues unresolved, when most months the percentage was much higher? It’s important to look at the entire picture, and to understand the data you are looking at (and if possible, what caused it) before you share reports and discuss results.

4: Keep a scorecard

When a store clerk or passerby asks you how you are feeling, it’s customary to respond briefly with “I’m fine” or “A bit tired today.” It’s a quick way to summarize how you are feeling, without giving them the blow-by-blow account of every event over the last month or more that has lead up to how you are feeling today.

The same principle should apply in IT metrics and reporting. If you’re not using a scorecard as a simple, high-level way to both evaluate and communicate your team’s performance, it’s time to start now. An effective scorecard will include the objective or measurement you are scoring yourself against, and an easy “traffic light” system to indicate your current progress: red (at risk), yellow (caution), or green (good).

The most important thing about a scorecard is to be honest. Nobody performs perfectly at all times, so giving yourself a green smiley across every category at every reporting interval will likely cause more alarm and disbelief than praise. Plus, when something truly does go wrong, you are more likely to get support and understanding if you have been candidly assessing your performance and flagging the areas that are putting you at risk.

A basic scorecard for operational performance might look something like this, and is a great way to quickly update stakeholders without burying them in unnecessary technical data.

Screenshot (12)

More advanced scorecards, like balanced scorecards, can measure IT’s contribution to larger business goals, and are effective at tracking the performance across entire organizations and companies.

Putting it all to use

The above are just guiding principles to help you narrow in on what you want to report, and how. To learn more about implementing SLAs and metrics in JIRA Service Desk, watch Lucas Dussurget’s killer presentation at Atlassian Summit 2014. It’s full of our own top tricks, examples, and best practices based on tons of customer implementations. And for a deep-dive on figuring out what you should be measuring, be sure to check out another excellent presentation from Summit 2014–this one by John Custy.

 

This article was originally published on the Atlassian website.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nikki Nguyen

Associate Product Marketing Manager, JIRA Service Desk

Although my life in IT is behind me, it’s not too far away. I’m now a recovering systems administrator evangelizing the way teams work by using JIRA Service Desk. I’ve found a love of combining customer service with technology.

 

Nikki is presenting at Service Management 2015.

 

 

 

By |2018-03-19T16:23:22+10:00July 22nd, 2015|Atlassian, blog, guest blogger, metrics, reporting, Service Management 2015|

The Other Big Data Problem

 

David-Oakley-Service-Now-Grey-Scale

 

 

 

by guest blogger David Oakley, Managing Director, ANZ at ServiceNow.

It’s hard to miss one of today’s biggest technology opportunities confronting large enterprises – big data. Companies are amassing vast amounts of data ranging from website activity, user data, support issues and even directly from products that are deployed in the field. The quest, of course, is to find patterns, glean understanding and extract knowledge that will help improve the company’s business.

Unlocking the big data opportunity represents massive upside for enterprises, but there’s another big data issue plaguing many IT organisations. In many cases, IT lacks a single source of truth, a centralised, comprehensive understanding of IT services, the hardware and software underpinning these services, the way they interact and are configured, the cost of delivering these services, service level management, the demands for new or improved services, the associated projects, the upcoming changes and how all of these things Interact.

For IT, the service experience is the end state. This IT big data challenge stems from the necessity of IT to deliver on this service experience, to keep the services running and rapidly change as business needs change.

The lack of comprehensive truth directly translates to essential qualities, such as data centre or network uptime, application availability, security, ease of maintenance and the ability to implement change. Simply put, when you don’t know what you are working with, how it is configured or should be configured and how it impacts other things, you are fundamentally working in the dark. The repercussions are enormous. The wasted time spent by companies chasing what they think the issue is rather than what it really is becomes a massive overhead.

At a base level is the Configuration Management Database (CMDB) – often the object of controversy and deep misunderstanding. Who takes ownership? How is it done? How do you make it comprehensive? Is CMDB the starting point or the finishing line? Then, as soon as it is created, it is out of date!

The issue is not just the CMDB itself but the fragmentation that exists among IT tools and systems—islands and moats that prevent a centralised view and systematic consistency. Solving this crisis necessitates jettisoning individual, standalone tools and having a single system of record for IT. Once you have moved to a single system of record, you can focus on streamlining your process to ensure accuracy and decrease the time taken to recover from system impact. Ultimately, it means service quality up, costs down and a level of control that the business expects.

In the end, it is IT’s sole purpose to be a trusted advisor and service delivery partner for their users. After all, so much of the organisation is reliant on the data that IT manages for company services.

Does your IT organisation have a single understanding of IT costs and charge back? Service delivery – both by internal and vendor sources? Hardware and software asset management? Can you ensure consistency across all delivery models and resources? Are you well positioned for effectively managing an ever-changing landscape of applications and infrastructure? And are you prepared to extend your data across the company?

If the answer is ‘No’ to many or all of the above then a single system of record for IT is a proven solution to your IT big data challenge.

 

This article was originally published in the itSMFA April 2015 Bulletin.

 

By |2018-03-19T16:23:22+10:00June 10th, 2015|Big Data, guest blogger, ITSM, Service Management 2015|
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