QandA

/QandA

Q&A with an Industry Awards nominee

Q&A with an Industry Awards nominee

In this third installment of the guest blogger Q&A series, itSMF Board member Justin Gasparre shares his recommendations on nominating for the itSMF Industry Awards and his experience at the Gala Awards Dinner.


Can you tell us why you decided to nominate for the 2016 Service Management Awards?

I was nominated for the awards by a close colleague who had observed my contribution to the itSMF community over many years. I agreed to accept it as I have contributed many years of volunteer effort to itSMF, from local chapter support and representation through to a position on the board over two periods.  I’ve also contributed very openly to my colleagues in Defence and anyone else who needs help in this space.

What do you think makes a compelling Awards nomination?

A compelling awards nomination will need to speak to the person’s contribution to the cause and the community.  I guess you can’t be a champion if you don’t champion what we do and the value we bring as ITSM professionals.

Can you tell us about your experience at the 2016 Gala Dinner and Awards celebration? What were the highlights?

For me, the highlight of the Gala Dinner in 2016 was being able to stand up in front of my peers and share the message that we are all champions and to share my gratitude to the forum and community.  It was also great that my past colleagues were there to share in the accolades!

Why are the itSMF Industry Awards important?

The itSMF industry awards are an important event to showcase the significance of the work that the community is involved in and the improvements that we make on a daily basis.  Having national recognition for great work being done is important and it is good to see that the major IT news sources are picking up on the event.

What advice would you give potential nominees?

The advice I would give to potential nominees is to NOMINATE!!!  Don’t be shy!  Recognise the contribution you make and get your colleagues to put you up for an award.  If you’ve got a nickname for your Service Management prowess, then you’re probably a candidate!

What are you looking forward to at Service Management 2017?

I’m looking forward to Service Management 2017 and the 20th anniversary of the itSMF, it should be a great event and a fabulous Gala Dinner.  I really enjoy catching up with colleagues from the past and making new connections with like minded professionals and those who contribute to the development of our forum and community.

If you’d like to nominate for an itSMF individual or team award you can find more information on the website.


Justin Gasparre has over 15 years of IT experience ranging from helpdesk, field support, systems administration and culminating with IT Governance, Board of Management Representation, Director of a large APS organisation delivering enterprise solutions and now business owner and consultant.

Trained in a variety of best practice methodologies and being from a technical background, having operated an IT Solution provision business, and working in multiple major Government Enterprise environments, Justin has an excellent understanding of IT and Business.

Q&A with an alumni speaker

Q&A with an alumni speaker

In the second part of a series of chats with those that have previously taken the stage at the Service Management Conference – Leanne Siveyer kindly shares her speaking experience and tips.


Hi Leanne! Please tell us a little about yourself – what is your area of expertise and what kind of Conference speaking experience do you have (if any)?

I have been involved with Service Management for most of my career in both operational and consulting roles. I’ve delivered countless training courses and presented to various sized groups. The ITSM is one of the largest audiences I have presented to.

What would you say are the top benefits you gain from sharing your expertise and insights at a Conference as a speaker?

You definitely get out of a conference what you put in. It’s an honour to be able to share my experiences with the conference audience and be able to contribute to the body of knowledge by sharing case studies that I have been involved with. We all know the theory – the challenge is in the implementation which is why I love hearing and sharing case studies from the real world.

In the past, you joined the speaker line-up for the Service Management Conference via the anonymous submission system. Can you describe your experience with this process? 

The process is straightforward and seems very fair to all submissions. Some of the questions and comments during the process helped me to refine my idea further and resulted in a better delivery.

How was your experience at the Conference overall as both a speaker and an attendee? 

I love the passion and the enthusiasm and being able to contribute to that is is a wonderful experience.

What was your favourite part of it the Conference experience? Can you share some standout moments?

The number of people that came up to me after my presentation – keen to introduce themselves and further discuss the ideas I have presented. That’s definitely what is all about.

What were the most important learnings you took away from the Conference experience?

As I mentioned earlier – we all know the theory but there are real and difficult real world challenges that prevent us from implementing the all best practice guidance in the books. The more people that have overcome those challenges and shared those experiences the better we call all be at maturing our service management approaches.

What advice would you give someone looking to submit a proposal to the Service Management Conference this year?

Present something you’d like to hear yourself. Don’t be scared – definitely do it. If it’s your first time – consider co-presenting with a more experienced speaker for support.

By |2018-03-19T16:23:17+00:00June 29th, 2017|guest blogger, QandA, Service Management 2017|

Q&A with an alumni speaker!

Q&A with an alumni speaker!

In this first installment of a series of chats with those that have previously taken the stage at the Service Management Conference – Paul Edwards kindly shares his speaking experience and tips.

Hi Paul! Please tell us a little about yourself – what is your area of expertise and what kind of Conference speaking experience do you have (if any)?

I’ve got a 25 year background in IT, ranging from duty programmer (the parent of help desk and the grandparent of service desk), managing Unix and VMS boxes, lecturing, running high performance computing and visualisation systems, IT Service Management consulting, strategic consulting, being an in-house consultant/troubleshooter in the financial services sector, mentor to various amazing people working in technology, being mentored by equally amazing people who work in technology, and most recently running projects and governance functions for cyber security in a big bank. Overall, I would say I am a people person rather than a technology person.

In terms of conference speaking experience, I’ve presented several times for the itSMFA, spoken at a number of other conferences (generally in the secondary and tertiary educations spaces), and spent many hours watching conference speakers and learning from all of them.

What would you say are the top benefits you gain from sharing your expertise and insights at a Conference as a speaker?

There are three big benefits:

  • First, it really helps me refine my ideas (and in one memorable case, changing my idea 180 degrees!) Writing a white paper or Conference paper cannot be beaten as far as stress testing the topic you are talking about.
  • Second, there’s a kind of intellectual endorphin rush I get from knowing that for the last 50-odd minutes, a group of people have walked away with some more knowledge, probably some interesting questions to explore if they are inclined to do so, and hopefully ideas on how to change the status quo.
  • Finally, I’ve made some lifelong professional connections and friendships thorough people who have come up to me to talk / ask me / grill me about my session.

In the past, you joined the speaker line-up for the Service Management Conference via the anonymous submission system. Can you describe your experience with this process?

This was excellent. I found that the process meant that the reviewers were providing feedback, which in turn challenged me to make the presentation clearer and (I suspect) more successful. My paper went through four iterations once I had submitted it; almost every suggestion from the reviewers was valid, they challenged me to think more deeply about both the topic and how best to communicate the ideas, and ultimately ended up having me present a paper that was far better than the one I originally submitted.

How was your experience at the Conference overall as both a speaker and an attendee?

As a speaker: the full gamut of emotions. Will anyone come to see me speak? Oh good, there’s a few people. Oh dear, I must have made the abstract too persuasive, because the room is now full. And now there are people standing at the back because there are no seats left! I hope I will not be wasting their time! Uh oh, I’m getting introduced now. Up on stage. Hand grabbing my stomach from the inside. Got through the introduction OK. Getting into a rhythm now. This is great. What, there’s only five minutes left? Questions, answers, the session is over, but now more people want to talk to me. Let’s do it over a cuppa. Relief. Relax.

As an attendee: great fun. A range of interesting and challenging speakers. A range of interesting attendees. A chance to catch up with people I’ve not seen in years, and a chance to make new friends.

What was your favourite part of it the Conference experience? Can you share some standout moments?

I’m going to cheat and have two:

First, (and this is fairly generic): walking out of a talk, thinking, I can’t *wait* to try and do that. Or thinking: wow, I did not know that, and X is now really interesting and I should look into it more deeply.

Second, the people you meet.

Standout moments? Generally anything involving Peter Doherty in a bar.

What were the most important learnings you took away from the Conference experience?

For 2016: the Cynefin framework; Vinh Giang and breaking things down; Karen Ferris’ approach to picking the top three competencies in ITSM; learning that it is possible to become accredited as a Lego® Play facilitator (now on my bucket list).

What advice would you give someone looking to submit a proposal to the Service Management Conference this year?

Give it a go. The anonymous peer review system means that even if ultimately you do not get selected, you will mature your ideas. If you do get selected, it is a fabulous opportunity to develop your speaking skills, and add to your professional network.

Submissions to speak at Service Management 2017 close on Friday 12 May 2017 – find out more and submit a proposal here.

By |2018-03-19T16:23:17+00:00May 4th, 2017|blog, QandA, Service Management 2016, Service Management 2017|

Q&A with Sandy Mamoli!

Sandy Mamoli Photo

 

 

 

 

 

From working with Sony Ericsson’s global enterprise website in Amsterdam and Copenhagen to being one of NZ’s leading Agile coaches and Chair of Agile Welly , Sandy Mamoli brings her practical European flair and passionate advocacy of all things Agile to NZ businesses. She’s a former Olympian, a geek, a gadget junkie and emerging triathlete. Sandy is one of the owners and co-founders of Nomad8.

You know your way around a Kanban board. How would you explain the concept to a beginner?

Kanban is a way of managing your list of things to do. In a clear and visual way you can see what’s important and urgent, as well as what you’ve achieved and what’s coming up. It’s tactile – moving sticky notes from one column to the next is immensely satisfying. And it’s universal – from school kids managing their homework schedule to developers planning their tasks and stories, it works.

Has your use of Kanban changed the way you approach things outside of the workplace? If so how?

I admit that I use my Kanbanfor1 board for almost everything now. It gives me a really clear sense of what’s on my plate both in and out of work. I feel a lot more in control of my ‘things to do’ which actually gives me more freedom to enjoy my non-busy time. My partner and I even share a board when we’re planning together – like a holiday, or moving house.

If you could express the essence of Kanban in one word, what would it be and why?

One word – that’s hard! I want to say ‘simplicity’ but there’s also ‘productivity’ and a certain amount of ‘zen’.

The best word though may well be ‘flow’.
Tasks and work and projects flow through your life. Kanban helps to manage that flow. The board lets you visualise the flow.

You’re a former Olympian and no stranger to achievement! Tell us a bit about the qualities one needs to think like an Olympian in their work.

Focus, ambition, collaboration. An Olympic athlete is no stranger to these things. Hours and weeks and months and years of hard, consistent training. Laser sharp focus on the task at hand. A shared team goal and purpose. Big dreams and the courage to follow through. There is no time for slackers, but there is much learning from failure. I think I’m a lot less intense now than in those days, but I still work hard and love a good massage!

 

Sandy will be leading a workshop on Kanbanfor1 at Service Management 2015.

By |2018-03-19T16:23:23+00:00May 5th, 2015|blog, ITSM, Kanban, QandA, Service Management 2015, Workshop|

Gamification – What is in for you as an ITSM expert playing Apollo13?

Suresh GP Photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

By guest blogger Suresh GP

This blog stems from my experience participating at the Apollo 13 Business simulation played in Delhi recently.

We had around 8 delegates who were specialized in delivering ITSM engagements internally or externally to their clients. One of the key differences of the workshop was that we had 8 people from 6 different companies who were meeting and interacting for the first time.

From a background and experience perspective, delegates had around 10+ years of experience on average and belonged to some leading end user organizations/IT companies in India & abroad. While the participants voiced several key learnings over the 4 rounds as mentioned below, I had some great eye openers with this event and that is the beauty of running such simulations. Every time, the context, reflection and outcomes are totally different.

My personal takeaways from the whole exercise were as follows

a) Forming, Norming, Storming and Performing exercise team building can be done easily when you have the new joiners running through this simulation as part of the New- Hire Orientation. They have fun, learn a lot and develop personal bonds quickly before they are deployed to projects

b) While trainings like ITIL V3 Foundation need an investment of 2 days worth of time and effort, these simulations bring about significant learning aspects to build competencies like knowledge, behaviors, skills and attitude

c) One of the ITIL V3 Expert trainers mentioned that this simulation was an eye opener and a great experience of learning by doing. By this way he believed that the retention of knowledge would be far longer for students

d) It would be a great opportunity to play a simulation with the project stakeholders before kicking off the ITSM project. There is a whole lot of things that we unlearn and learn just by doing

e) Finally, lots of people have difficulty in articulating how to drive CSI in their organizations. With rounds 1 to 4, there are action items that get reflected by participants that allow us to see definite improvements to carry those skills into the workplace. This could aid them for better efficiency and effectiveness in their journey to service excellence.

Suresh GP is conducting a workshop on ‘Gamification: Apollo 13 – Failure is not an Option!

By |2018-03-19T16:23:23+00:00May 5th, 2015|blog, Gamification, ITSM, QandA, Service Management 2015, Workshop|

Q&A with Rob England!

Rob England Photo Rob England is a self-employed IT commentator and consultant. Internationally, he is best known for his blog The IT Skeptic and half a dozen books on IT. Rob was the NZ IT Service Management Champion for 2010, and his blog was voted the best “IT consultant and analyst” blog in the UK’s Computer Weekly IT Blog Awards for 2010. He is an acknowledged contributor to ITIL (2011 Service Strategy book).

You’re known as the IT Skeptic. How might your brand of skepticism be beneficial when approaching service management?

The IT sector is prone to fads. We are an ill-disciplined rabble who run after anything shiny and noisy that comes by. There is a deficiency of data supporting many ideas, and an absence of objectivity, especially amongst the vendors and analysts who drum up whole new products. CMDB is a case in point. Somebody has to provide an antidote to the Kool Aid. I try to do that with a dose of common sense and realism.

The hashtag you started on twitter, #SMtruths has encouraged some great responses – what are some of your favourites and why?

The #SMTruths idea came to me when i looked at my burger (I don’t often eat fast food) and realised it bore no resemblance to the shiny picture on the menu I ordered from. So I started tweeting reflections on the profound fundamentals of service management, the enduring truths that underlie all the more complex ideas we lay on top.

I want the thread to be thoughtful, lateral, insightful, startling, and amusing. And of course: its a hashtag thread, so folk can join in. I compile them here.
Some of my favourites are:

It takes as long as it takes to put the fire out.
MTTR as a service level target is silly.

The world refuses to be defined, repeatable, managed and measured.
We cannot treat everything in IT as if it were a manufacturing process. Manufacturing concepts have been way over-used. (See also MTTR).

In a dynamically changing world, no process or technology is as flexible as humans.
We are way too quick to jump to technology. Often people are better. (See also CMDB)

IT is 1% innovation.
IT people are fascinated by novelty and transformation. Most of the time we ought to be getting on with our jobs.

A service is not an object or technology. It is an action, activity, people. Use verbs to describe services.
Self-explanatory that one.

Your upcoming workshop is titled ‘Dead Cat Syndrome.’ Outside of sounding like a wave of bad luck for the veterinarian community – what does this concept mean for those in service management and what is your prescribed cure for it?

In many organisations, putting a new project into production is akin to lobbing a dead cat over a wall. No operating model, little or no operational procedures developed, minimal last minute training for the service desk and operations. Supplier contracts don’t align with service commitments. There are no service commitments – no SLA exists. The project disbands the moment the system goes live. If you are lucky someone is still around to answer questions.
IT Operations needs to put controls in place to prevent this. Projects benefit from these controls by having a better definition of the end goal and a better end product. You can find out more here.

Catch Rob England’s workshops on both ‘Dead Cat Syndrome’  and ‘BSM: Basic Service Management’ at at Service Management 2015.

By |2018-03-19T16:23:23+00:00April 24th, 2015|blog, ITSM, QandA, Service Management 2015, SMTruths, Workshop|