lanaTake a sneak peek into one of Service Management 2016’s pre-Conference workshops with guest blogger Lana Yakimoff. Lana is leading two half-day workshops this year: ‘Are you being served? An operational readiness review’, and ‘From BID strategy to operational delivery – where does it all go wrong?’

 

So many corporate and government organisations are ‘transforming’, ‘integrating’, and introducing new services. Stakeholders at times are nervous leading up to the actual ‘go live’ period. However, during Service Transition, an ORR (operational readiness review) can provide reassurance to the custodians of the new service, ensuring all elements required are ready to transition into operations.

The aim of the Operational Readiness process is to help reassure your stakeholders or customers while your project is in flight-mode. The key objective is to ensure the service is working towards readiness for operations to assume full ownership. This activity also helps to provide assurance to stakeholders, and there is sign off and acceptance from the Operational team. It can also identify and manage any risk during the review process. Those risks typically include omitted or unplanned components discovered during an ORR, and allows time to mitigate and resolve the issue/s.

An ORR can cover so many phases or lifecycles, as well as readiness for many different items, including:

  • Design documents: from a high level to detailed solution design documents
  • BCP and ITSCM design, test and acceptance
  • Testing phases documents: test strategy, test cases, scheduling, testing phase acceptance, defect acceptance
  • Business management system readiness
  • Entire Training Phase acceptance – but also tracking all items leading up to training delivery
  • Maintenance and service quality plans

An ORR also includes operational needs which are vital for a smooth transition into service:

  • Account login details provided
  • Support documentation
  • Knowledge articles at the ready
  • Administrative account access or privileged rights
  • Testing phase planning elements and completion
  • Training phase planning to completion
  • Operational monitoring readiness
  • Governance and management forums
  • Specific operational needs to support a service
  • Various operational needs of a business
  • Business processes designed and integrated, ranging from procurement, billing and/or customised reporting needs

Finally, ORR also includes service desk staff remote access and management tools, such as:

  • Procurement
  • Training
  • Operational testing
  • Operational access testing

This is by no means an exhaustive list; ORR also covers many other key topics, from security to organisational change readiness.

Every customer will have similar but also very different needs. A typical project plan will have high-level details and deliverables, however, there are many details that typically are not included in a project plan. An ORR can help keep track of operational items leading up to go-live readiness assessment and decision making.

I’ve undertaken many of these reviews to help provide assurances. A real-time pulse check can show where you’re actually at versus where you should be and potentially allow time to remediate and refocus effort. There are many business benefits to an ORR; when conducted correctly, it can add enormous value.

In my interactive workshop at Service Management 2016, we will cover:

  • A framework approach to conducting a complex or simple ORR
  • Workshops and meetings that can help you conduct an ORR
  • Building relevant IP required

This half day pre-conference workshop at Shake I.T. Up 2016 will provide information, discussions and IP to help ensure a well-focused ORR. Come and join me for a half day interactive workshop, whether you’re an operations lead, consultant, customer or service provider. Learn how to Shake I.T. Up before you Serve I.T. Up.