Monthly Archives: July 2016

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Transformation goes beyond adoption and adapting

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Matt Hooper is speaking at Service Management 2016. He is an industry advocate for Service Management strategies and best practices around Enterprise Service Management. For over 20 years Matt has instituted methodologies for business intelligence and optimisation. Leveraging technology to drive business outcomes, he has built an industry reputation for his highly effective approach to creating value through Service Management. Matt is active on social media known as VigilantGuy, and co-hosts the weekly podcast: Hacking Business Technology (HackBizTech.com).

The latest content from Axelos, the makers of ITIL®, “ITIL® Practitioner Guidance”, heavily re-states an already existing mantra of ITIL®, Adapt and Adopt.  The reality is, this guidance is much too little and way too late. The premise and principal behind this mantra is that we have to evaluate our current state of operational delivery capabilities, then apply the pieces of ITIL® that will help us make improvements.

This was solid guidance 10 years ago, when IT had a fighting chance to demonstrate that they were the responsible functional area to capitalise on digital strategies to lead business innovation. However, few organisations’ IT departments stepped into that role. An overtly and polarised focus on technology and process left most IT departments less cohesive, with larger walls of bureaucracy between IT operations, development, enterprise architecture and the PMO (Project Management Office – seriously, they have their own office).

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Digital transformation is not merely improving what’s not working today.  Transformation is the complete re-conditioning, re-structuring, and re-thinking of how digitisation is enabling organisations to act differently. ITSM professionals must truly transform if they are going to survive the new business dynamic, where “IT” is no longer a department but a pervasive business competency.

While the ITIL Practitioner Guidance has been updated with new terms and references and new more Agile concepts, there are 5 areas where “Adapt & Adopt” will just not cut it:

  • Language
  • Knowledge
  • Asset/Configuration
  • Change/Release
  • Requirements

To be a leader in Digital Transformation, ITSM professionals need to do their own personal transformation. Like a caterpillar to a butterfly, they need to re-condition, re-structure and re-think their role in business enablement.

To learn how to be truly transformative, join me at itSMF Australia’s annual Service Management conference on Wednesday 17 – Thursday 18 August in Brisbane, Australia. I’ll be speaking at 12pm on Wednesday 17 August on: Creating enterprise agility through Lean service management and DevOps.

 

By |2018-03-19T16:23:18+00:00July 28th, 2016|Service Management 2016, transformation|

Announcing keynote speaker Dave Snowden’s Service Management workshops!

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Dave Snowden is founder and Chief Scientific Officer at Cognitive Edge, and the founder and Director of the Centre for Applied Complexity at Bangor University in Wales. He will give a keynote address at Service Management 2016.

 

 

Keynote speaker and internationally-renowned scholar Dave Snowden has announced two exclusive workshops at Service Management 2016.

Dave Snowden will offer morning and afternoon workshops on ‘Cynefin and decision-making’ and ‘Human sensor networks’.

This year’s workshops take place on Tuesday 16 August, giving attendees a chance to dive into topics like complexity theory, Agile, Lean IT and DevOps, Extreme Leadership, SIAM, operational readiness and more.

Cynefin and decision-making with Dave Snowden

Half-Day: 9:00am – 12:30pm

An introduction to complexity science and Dave Snowden’s Cynefin Framework that will change the way you understand leadership and decision-making. Take away a framework that will change the way you see the world, and tools to help you to understand and act on big, difficult problems and decisions.

Human sensor networks with Dave Snowden

Half-Day: 1:30pm – 5:00pm

Discover a new approach to policy- and decision-making, and learn how to make the most of your organisational networks. You will leave with the knowledge and skills to create and make the most of human sensor networks in your organisation.

For more information on Service Management workshops, please visit the website.

By |2018-03-19T16:23:18+00:00July 21st, 2016|Service Management 2016, Workshop|

Why you should tear up your support SLAs

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Guest blogger Dave O’Reardon returns today to explain ‘why you should tear up your support SLAs’. You can also check out Dave’s tips for the 2016 itSMF Industry Awards for Excellence in IT Service Management in last week’s blog post!

 

Have you heard of the Watermelon Effect? It’s a rather common problem where Service Level Agreement reports for IT support show that everything is green but the customer is still unhappy. Green (statuses) on the outside, red (angry customer) on the inside.

 

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Research from Forrester shows how prevalent this mismatch of perceptions is – there are about twice as many IT teams that think they provide great IT support than there are businesses who feel they are getting it.

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One of the causes of this problem is that the metrics used in Service Level Agreements are a deeply flawed way of measuring service quality. They mislead IT support teams into thinking they understand how the customer feels about the service they provide.

Typically, support service levels are measured on the basis of time – actual vs target time to respond, actual vs target time to resolve. But purely time-based measures are an ineffective indicator of the quality of IT support.

Our customers’ experience of IT support is shaped by many things, not just how quickly we responded or resolved their issue. Factors such as how they were treated, whether they could understand what they were being told or asked to do, whether they felt well informed about what was going on and what would happen next (and when), and whether they were asked to confirm their issue was solved before the ticket was closed.

Even something like time is not absolute. From personal experience, we all know there are many factors that can make the same absolute wait time feel longer or shorter.

Ultimately, these experience factors are all about expectations and perceptions, not absolutes. The perceptions of those at the receiving end of the service – our customers. And the outcome of their judgement is their level of satisfaction.

David Maister, a researcher on the psychology of waiting times, described this rather succinctly with the formula: S=P-E, where S stands for satisfaction, P for perception and E for expectation. As P and E are both psychological in nature, S can be attained when a customer’s perceived experience of a service, P, exceeds their expectations, E.

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If you want to measure service quality (and you work in Service Management, so you should, right!), the best way to do that is to ask your customers. Valarie Zeithaml put this rather nicely in her book, Delivering Quality Service: “Only customers judge quality. All other judgments are essentially irrelevant”.

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We need to stop putting so much focus on traditional SLA metrics and start focusing on customer satisfaction. The extent to which you can keep your customers happy determines whether your customer trusts you or bypasses you, forgives your mistakes or hauls you over the coals, increases your budgets or squeezes them, keeps you as their service provider or outsources you.

And if you’re always asking your customers to not just rate your service, but to tell you what you need to do to improve (one of the principles behind the Net Promoter System), you’ll find this feedback to be a very powerful way to drive continual service improvement.

By all means measure response and resolution times for your own purposes, but never wave a green service level performance report in front of a customer and tell them they should be happy.

This post was based on an e-book, “Measuring the Quality of IT Support”, which can be downloaded here.

Dave O’Reardon helps IT support teams adopt Net Promoter practices and use customer feedback to drive continual service improvement. He’s the founder and CEO of Silversix, the company behind www.cio-pulse.com, and winner of the Service Management ‘Innovation of the Year Award’ in 2015. Dave can be reached on Twitter via @silversix_dave or LinkedIn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

By |2018-03-19T16:23:19+00:00July 14th, 2016|guest blogger, ITSM, metrics, Net Promoter®, Netpromoter, Service Management 2016|

ITSMF Awards Q&A with 2015 winner Dave O’Reardon

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In this week’s special edition of the blog, itSMF Awards winner Dave O’Reardon shares his insights into the Awards process, and gives you some invaluable tips for your application for the 2016 itSMF Industry Awards for Excellence in IT Service Management!

 

Can you tell us about your award?

We were lucky enough to win last year’s Service Management Innovation of the Year Award for a new software product we’d developed called cio-pulse.com.

CIOPulse gathers customer feedback as support teams resolve customer tickets and then helps organisations use that feedback to drive continual service improvement.

Every man and his dog uses the survey capability of their ITSM tool, but we won the award because CIOPulse helps support teams to improve customer satisfaction, not just measure it.

What inspired you to nominate for the itSMF Industry Awards?

Because we genuinely felt we were onto something truly innovative within IT service management and we had the metrics to prove it.

Our company, Silversix, used to be a traditional ITSM consultancy, although it was always one that specialised in improving internal customer satisfaction.  About five years ago, we came across this set of practices – the Net Promoter System – used by organisations around the world (think Apple, Rackspace, Harley Davidson) to measure and improve customer loyalty. One of our consulting clients allowed us to experiment on them by letting us help them adopt some Net Promoter practices. Six months later, they’d increased internal customer satisfaction by significantly more than we’d achieved with them via ITSM consulting in the preceding 3 years.

We built CIOPulse to help organisations adopt these same practices and enjoy the same benefits. Our metrics showed that 90% of our clients have been successful with CIOPulse and this gave us the confidence to nominate ourselves.

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What advice would you give aspiring nominees?

I have only one piece of advice and I don’t want to dilute it by mixing it up with any other advice. My advice is this. Enter. Just do it, as Nike would say. There are probably not as many entrants for each award category as you think and so, just by entering, you have a very good chance of winning.

Can you share any tips for the application process?

Yes. I’ve got a couple of tips.

Read the award criteria and make sure your submission explains how your innovation meets those criteria.  We were going to nominate CIOPulse for the award a year earlier but realised that we weren’t going to meet one of the criteria. So we held off for another year. And that turned out to be the right thing to do.

Make your supporting video funny and/or interesting. Everyone at the awards night wants to have fun and being made to watch a video about how your company makes flare joints for gas pipes is not fun.  All finalists get their video played and so, even if you’re not a winner, your video might get airtime. If it’s fun or interesting or both, you’re going to get the attention of hundreds of people in the room and they’ll remember it/you. If it’s boring I’m afraid they’re going to talk over it.

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What are the benefits of winning an itSMF Award?

The short term benefit was how much more fun it made the awards night. The gala dinner is always great, but the added suspense of being a finalist, not to mention the feeling of actually winning, made it a super special evening. Strangely, my head was much sorer than usual the next morning…

And for those of us involved in developing the product, it gave us an immense feeling of satisfaction to be recognised by the industry that we’ve worked in for so long. These kinds of awards are great to put on your CV and LinkedIn profile too!

Of course we’ve also made full use of the award in all our marketing material – email footers, websites, brochures, presentations, sales pitches. It’s difficult to quantify that benefit, but it has certainly given us a welcome boost to our credibility, as well as increased brand awareness.

To nominate yourself, your company or a colleague for the 2016 itSMF Awards, visit the website!

 

By |2018-03-19T16:23:19+00:00July 7th, 2016|Awards, ITSM, Service Management 2016|